Catacombs Rome tickets

If you want to know how to book Catacombs Rome tickets, then you’ve come to the right place. This comprehensive guide tells you everything you need to know about booking catacombs Rome tickets, including tickets price, guided tours, special combos and much more.

 

How much do Catacombs Rome tickets cost?

Catacombs Rome tickets price

Catacombs Rome tickets price:

  • Standard admission fee adults: €8
  • Standard admission fee concessions (children aged between 7 to 16 years old): €5
  • Ages up to 6-years-old: free admin

There are five catacombs in Rome that you can visit, and each costs the same price.

All tickets include an English tour guide, who will tell you about the varied history of the catacombs in Rome.

 

How to book Catacombs Rome tickets?

You may book your Catacombs Rome tickets at the office desk or on the official website. It’s worth booking tickets in advance online, as the catacombs in Rome are very popular and are often fully booked during peak season.

There are also travel agencies that offer tickets for the Roman catacombs with extras such as transport, bespoke guides, and other attractions. There are many different types of tickets available, and you can cater your visit to the type of tour you want to experience.

Many tours include transport, night access, tour guides in various languages, combined attractions, and  even all-inclusive meals. These vary in price but average out at around €35.

Make sure that you take the time to compare the different deals available so that you find the best price.

Use Tourscanners search to find the best prices and tours available.

 

Are there any Catacombs Rome combined tickets?

Catacombs Rome combined tickets

Rome is full of exciting, culturally-rich attractions. It’s one of the most visited cities in the world for its architecture and majestic sites. Fortunately, there are a variety of tours you can combine with your catacombs of Rome visit – ideal if you wish to experience several attractions during the same day. 

The three most popular combination tours are:

Looking for a decor of skeleton? Head to the Capuchin Crypt. Located beneath the church of Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini, the Crypt is decorated with the bones of over 4,000 friars. You will feel a chill down your spines as soon as you enter the ossuary.

Most of the Roman Catacombs opened to the public are located on the Appian Way. This is a great opportunity to visit one of the most famous ancient roads in Rome. Don’t miss visiting the Claudian Aqueduct nearby.

You will find very close to the Roman Catacombs the Baths of Caracalla – one of the largest thermal baths of the antiquity. They were used by the Romans for hygiene and also to socialize.

There are many other combined Catacombs Rome tickets including other attractions such as the Colosseum or the Vatican museums. Compare all the deals available and save time & money.

 

What will you see?

Catacombs Rome - what will you see

There are 60 catacombs throughout the city of Rome, though only five of them are open for public viewing. These are the catacombs of San Sebastiano, San Callisto, Priscilla, Domitilla, Sant Agnese. Each one is along the Appian Way, Europe’s first superhighway and one of Rome’s most iconic sights.

Catacombs of San Sebastiano

The San Sebastiano catacombs are underground burial chambers and were the very first to be given the name catacombs. Located near a cave (the reason for their name), they date back to the 1st century. Tours include preserved mausoleums and plastered walls with hundreds of invocations by Saints Peter and Paul.

Catacombs of San Callisto

The official cemetery of the Church of Rome in the 3rd century AD, San Callisto catacombs are the resting place of around half a million Christians. They are named after the deacon St. Callixtus, who was assigned by Pope Zephyrinus to the administration of the cemetery at the beginning of the 3rd century.

Catacombs of Priscilla

The queen of the catacombs, Priscilla sits on the Via Salaria and are among Rome’s most important. The underground cemetery was an important pilgrimage site throughout the Middle Ages and is where a number of martyrs are buried. They hold some of the first references to the Virgin Mary.

Catacombs of Domitilla

The catacombs of Domitilla are spread over 17km of underground caves, including some inaccessible areas, and are laid out over four levels. Today, the most common tombs can be seen along the walls of galleries. These include rectangular loculi, cut to the length of a single person.

Catacombs of Sant Agnese

It’s one of the oldest catacombs and is dedicated to Saint Agnes, a young woman living in Rome during the 4th century AD, who met her death at the young age of 12 or 13. They form part of the monumental complex of Sant’Agnese Fuori le Mura.

 

How to get to the Catacombs of Rome?

There are many ways to get to the catacombs, including arranged travel with specific tour companies. The catacombs are located along the Appian Way, just to the south of centre Rome, which you can get to by bus if you’re planning on taking public transport.

Bus 118 runs every day of the week at 20-minute intervals. It stops at the Catacombs of San Callisto and Catacombs of San Sebastiano.

 

Catacombs of Rome opening hours

  • Monday to Saturday: 9 am – 12 pm and 4 pm – 5 pm. 
  • The Catacombs of Sant’Agnese opens 9 am – 12 pm and 4 pm – 6 pm
 

Travel tips

Catacombs Rome travel tips

  • The underground passageways can be quite dark and damp, so make sure you bring adequate clothing.
  • The catacombs are less crowded in low seasons such as wintertime, mostly between November and April.
  • The catacombs can be up to 19 kilometres long and 20 metres deep. Bear this in mind if you’re claustrophobic, as tours for an hour or more.
  • Make sure to book online ahead of time during peak season.

If you have any more queries about the catacombs of Rome, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below. And we hope that you find the catacombs Rome tickets that provide you with the best tour for your needs.

Enjoy the Catacombs of Rome 🙂